Constitutional Property Rights Protection and Economic Growth: Evidence from the Post-Communist Transition

Reprint No. 2015:45

Author(s): Christian BjørnskovYear: 2015 Title: Constitutional Political Economy Volume (No.): 26 (3) Pages: 247–280
Online article (restrictions may apply)

This paper seeks to estimate the economic growth effect of constitutional provisions for property rights protection. It does so using the unique situation in formerly communist countries in Central and Eastern Europe and the Caucasus where all but two introduced new constitutions after the fall of the Iron Curtain. The effects of implementing different constitutional provisions can therefore be observed in a group of countries with similar formal starting points. Estimates provide no evidence of positive effects and mainly point towards a negative conclusion: the introduction of constitutional protection of property rights is not associated with economic development in the long run, but tends to impose costs during a period of institutional transition and implementation proportional to the constitutional change.

Bjørnskov, Christian (2015), "Constitutional Property Rights Protection and Economic Growth: Evidence from the Post-Communist Transition". Constitutional Political Economy 26(3), 247–280.

Christian Bjørnskov


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