Working Paper No. 470

The Within-Job Gender Wage Gap: The Case of Sweden

For the U.S. and for Norway it has been established that men and women working in the same occupation for the same employer receive more or less the same pay. So-called within-job wage discrimination is hence not a driving force for the gender wage gap. We report a comparative and comprehensive empirical study of wage differences between men and women in the same detailed occupation within the same establishment for a European economy, Sweden. We report three striking findings. The first is that within-job wage differences are relatively small. When one compares men and women who work in the same occupation and establishment: Women on average earn 1.4% less per hour than men among blue-collar workers, while 5.0% less among white-collar workers. The second finding is that among white-collar workers it is occupational segregation which really accounts for the existing wage differences and that establishment segregation accounts for less, whereas among blue-collar workers the two types of segregation are about equally important. The third finding is that even the within-occupation gaps are relatively small, less than 5% and 7% among blue- and white-collar workers respectively. We conducted these analyses for the period 1970-1990 and the results are stable over time.

Sick of Inequality?

An Introduction to the Relationship between Inequality and Health

Sick of Inequality.jpg

In this book Andreas Bergh, Therese Nilsson, IFN and Lund University, and Daniel Waldenström, IFN and Paris School of Economics, France, review the latest research on the relationship between inequality and health. What does inequality mean for our health? Does increasing income inequality affect outcomes such as obesity, life expectancy and subjective well-being?


Seminars organized by IFN


To present ongoing research informal brown-bag seminars are held on Mondays at 11:30 am. This is an opportunity for IFN researchers to test ideas and results.

Academically oriented seminars are most of the time held on Wednesdays at 10 am. At these events researchers from IFN and other institutions present their research.

In addition, IFN organizes seminars open to the public. Topics for these are derived from the IFN research.

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