Working Paper No. 1121

Inheritance and Wealth Inequality: Evidence from Population Registers

Published: March 29, 2016Pages: 49Keywords: Bequests; Estates; Net worth; Inheritance taxation; Wealth distributionJEL-codes: H24; D63; E21

Inheritance and Wealth Inequality: Evidence from Population Registers Mikael Elinder, Oscar Erixson and Daniel Waldenström

We use new population-wide register data on inheritances and wealth in Sweden to estimate the causal impact of inheritances on wealth inequality. We find that inheritances reduce relative wealth inequality (e.g., the Gini coefficient falls by 5–10 percent) but that absolute dispersion increases. Examining different parts of the wealth distribution, we find that the top decile’s wealth share decreases substantially, whereas the wealth share of the bottom half increases from a negative to a positive share. In essence, wealthier heirs inherit larger amounts, but less wealthy heirs inherit more relative to their pre-inheritance wealth.

We also find that post-inheritance behavioral adjustments mitigate the equalizing effect of inheritances because less wealthy heirs consume larger shares of their inheritances. Moreover, we find that the Swedish inheritance tax reduced the equalizing inheritance effect but that the redistribution of tax revenues could reverse this result. Finally, we show that inheritances increase wealth mobility.

Daniel Waldenström


Ph: +33-754844839
Mob: +46 70 4916082

Mikael Elinder


Ph: +46 18 471 1637
Mob: +46 70 769 0976

Sick of Inequality?

An Introduction to the Relationship between Inequality and Health

Sick of Inequality.jpg

In this book Andreas Bergh, Therese Nilsson, IFN and Lund University, and Daniel Waldenström, IFN and Paris School of Economics, France, review the latest research on the relationship between inequality and health. What does inequality mean for our health? Does increasing income inequality affect outcomes such as obesity, life expectancy and subjective well-being?


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