2019

Al and Future Skills in the Labour Market

Reprint No. 2019:6

Author(s): Mårten BlixYear: 2019 Title: Rethinking Law Volume (No.): 2 (1) Pages: 66–69

Al and Future Skills in the Labour Market Mårten Blix


The past provides some guidance on how to handle the effects of technological change on society and the labour market. The question is how much. During the Industrial Revolution, some skilled workers lost their jobs as factories were built and machines gradually came into use. This was a period of rapid and tumultuous change in society. It was also a time of significant urbanisation, as the young and able departed from the regions to find better lives and opportunities in the cities. It was not inevitable, but the social changes thrust upon people led to new ways to organize work and to lessen the risks to which individuals were exposed: The establishment of trade unions, the introduction of suffrage for both men and women, the right to a pension and social security, to name a few. New institutions and safety nets were part of a process towards safer and more inclusive democracies and societies.


Reference:
Blix, Mårten (2019), "Al and Future Skills in the Labour Market". Rethinking Law 2(1), 66–69.

Elgar Companion to

Social Capital and Health

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Martin Ljunge, IFN, is the author of a chapter, "Trust promotes health: addressing reverse causality by studying children of immigrants", in a new book edited by Sherman Folland and Eric Nauenberg. The cutting edge of research is presented, covering the ever-expanding social capital field.

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